About Chromadepth

These images are made using Chromadepth 3D (CD3). CD3 is done with just about any color medium like crayons, colored pencils or a computer graphics application.

C3D is a process that allows for the creation of a ‘normal’ looking image that can be viewed as two-dimensional, but which jumps into holographic 3D when viewed using C3D glasses.

It is the optics in the glasses that allows the viewer to see the colors jump into holographic 3D and float, both forward and backward.

1. Owl

Owl

2010 - The Owl was inspired by the lunch bag art I do for my son after I make his school lunch. This piece was part of the Double Vision show at the Attleboro Arts Museum in August, 2010.

2. Swirls

Swirls

2010 - Swirls

3. ChromArt 01

Chroma 01

2010 - This piece shows how colors react to each other. Some colors are on a different 'plane' when surrounded by a color.

4. ChromArt 02

ChromArt 02

2010

5. ChromArt 03

ChromAt 03

2011 - This started as a doodle in my sketchbook.

6. Tree No. 1

Tree No 1

2010 - A Christmas tree

7. Red No. 1

Red No. 1

2011 - Red No. 1 began as an experiment with the color of red and green.

8. Green No. 1

Green No. 1

2011 - Using just greens.

9. Floating

Floating

2011 - Inspired from those color-blind tests.

10. Cut n Paste Tree v2

Tree

2010 - Papercraft + Chromadepth

11. Quadrapod

Quadrapod

2010 - Colored pencil

12. Ying Yang

Ying Yang

2011 - Colored pencil

My Chromadepth

Color has been a fascination of mine ever since I took a required ‘Josef Albers’ color theory class as an under graduate at Rhode Island School of Design. The C3D process is an extension of that fascination with color and how colors change when surrounded by other colors.

My process begins with sketches on paper using colored pencils. I may digitally scan the sketch or use it as reference as I draw with a digital pen. The digital workflow allows me to make changes and experiment as the piece develops. The one thing that I keep in mind as I begin on a C3D image is that it has to stand on its own without the glasses. Seeing the image with glasses literally adds another dimension to the image.